home
 
Slavery and the Commerce Power
  • Nov 16, 2006
    240 p., 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
    8 b/w illus.
    ISBN: 9780300114706
  • Cloth: $65.00 tx
  • Add to Cart

History
Law


Slavery and the Commerce Power

How the Struggle Against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War

  • David L. Lightner
MAIN  BOOK  PAGE

Reviews

“An important book—one that will take a significant place in the scholarly literature on the antislavery movement and the coming of the Civil War.”—James M. McPherson, Princeton University

Slavery and the Commerce Power fills a major crack in interpretive arguments over Lincoln, the nature of the Constitution, the slave trade, and the coming of the Civil War. This book will be a standard in each of these areas, and no one interested in any of them can ignore Lightner’s interpretations.”—Kermit Hall, president, State University of New York at Albany  

 Top Seller in U.S. History as compiled by YBP Library Services

"In his rich, nuanced reading of his sources, Lightner demonstrates the importance—beyond just the 'commerce power'—of what one might call 'constitutional anti-slavery.'"—Gregory E. O'Malley, The New England Quarterly

"Offers an important new dimension to our understanding of sectional tensions. . . . [Lightner's] narrative and analysis are detailed, nuanced, and passionately argued."—Michael A. Morrison, Civil War History

"A valuable analysis of the American Civil War. . . . This interesting study will be used by scholars and general readers with pleasure and profit for some time to come. Lightner's specific conclusions will become part of the general explanation for the coming of America's defining moment. At the same time, his broader interpretations will be added to the crowded arena of Civil War debate where its solid foundation in contemporary research will ensure its continued viability."—Gordon B. McKinney, Enterprise and Society

"[An] important new study. . . . A valuable contribution to our growing understanding of how the domestic slave trade influenced secession and the Civil War."—Steven Deyle, Project Muse

TOP